Systems & Utilities


Looking for info on my solar system? Or how a composting toilet works? Or maybe how to do your laundry off grid? How do I heat, cook, get water? Find a place to park, get a loan, or insurance? Here's a list of my posts on such topics.
















22 comments:

  1. Hi Ariel, have reread your blog in the last few days and have a renewed appreciation for your life! You are one strong woman! My question is how do you ensure your grey water drains away from the house in the winter and does not freeze under the house or in whatever gets it away from the tiny house.
    Your entire blog is lovely, photos are stunning and I'm incredibly impressed with your dedication and competence at an age when most people are still getting on their feet.

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    1. It's a pretty steep downhill from my drain and the ground is very rocky here, therefore water drains well. The pipe just comes strait down and then is open to the ground. This means if the water is at all above freezing, and it's always at least room temp or warmer since it's usually dish water, it has no time to freeze in that small of a distance before running out onto the ground. So it works well for me. If you were parked in more of a depression or had ground that didn't drain water so well, you might have to come up with a little different system. And thank you. My parents taught me to do a lot of things at a young age and expected me to grow up and take care of myself. I think that helped a lot. ;)

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  2. I can't tell you how much I appreciate your blog! I am working towards getting an off-grid tiny house for myself in Alaska, and your posts have answered so many questions that I had and couldn't find an answer for anywhere else. Thank you so much!

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    1. Thank you so much for saying that! That's precisly why I started this blog, and writing does take a lot of time, so it's great to hear that people are finding it useful. Are you building your own house?

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  3. I love your home and I am designing one myself. I love that you're in a colder environment because I'm building mine in New England where it's winter for half the year, so it's helpful to find someone who has prepared for the seasons in their home. I'll be a bit more on the grid than you but the solutions you have done there are an amazing help for me. Thanks for sharing!

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    1. It's always good to hear that someone is helped by something on my blog! Because that's why I do it, in the hopes of helping others.

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  4. Ariel ... thanks for sharing! i love reading the blog and looks like you have an amazing first year. Question about long term parking - what have you done to level the house/protect the wheel base?

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    1. The wheels are still touching the ground, but the weight is on the jacks. The wheels are protected from the sun by the planters around them.

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  5. Hi Ariel, I love what you're doing. Read through all your posts and various info on your systems. I was just curious (not sure if you mentioned somewhere, I couldn't find it) what your monthly utility costs are with all your purchase of propane, gas, etc. Was curious the costs of living off grid. Thanks! Keep living the dream.

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    1. Nope. I need to do a post on that sometime here. The coldest winter month where a lot of the lows were around -30 F and the highs around zero, I spent about $100 on propane. That was for heating, cooking, and hot water. Now I have a wood stove as well, so I will spend only a fraction of that in the future. I didn't fill a propane tank from sometime in May till sometime in October. So all those months the cost was zero.

      Again, in the coldest, darkest month of the year, I probably used 25 gallons of gas, so you can figure the cost based on whatever current gas prices are in your area. That will be reduced a lot as well thanks to my wood stove. My vented propane heater uses electricity for the ignition and fan so if it's not running, there will be significantly less drain on my batteries and hence much less generator running to recharge them.

      My only other "utilities" costs would be my cell phone (a prepaid dumb phone) that costs me $13 to $29 a month depending on how much I want to talk. And then my internet. I pay $64 a month for a local wireless service.

      I hope that helps!

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    2. So would a person just starting out need to buy one of these houses by taking out a loan if they could not build it themselves? Can you get a loan for something like this? Do you have one (not trying to get personal but practical). A loan payback would have to be added to your monthly utilities (which are very low in your case, very small footprint) in order to get an idea of true cost. Thanks in advance for any reply. And good lock.

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    3. That is an option and what I did. See my whole post and video about the loan topic where I share all my details.

      http://fynyth.blogspot.com/2017/02/tiny-house-loan-video-version.html

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  6. I, like Miranda, am in a colder climate but down at the bottom of New Zealand. I am also designing a slightly bigger Tiny house as I've still got kids at home.
    It is refreshing and good to know that there is someone else out there in colder climates. I too am looking at a small wood stove but with wetback for water heating.
    The information you have about the solar and utilities is such a HUGE help! Thank You!

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    1. You are so welcome! I've always thought New Zealand would be an amazing place to visit some day.

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  7. "Utlilties"? Is that because "lil' utilities"? Or?

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    1. Just because I suck at spelling. ;) Thank you!

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  8. Ariel, how about making a topic on your appliances that you have and any good or bad comments about them. I would like to see that from everyone that has a tiny so we can get info on the appliances from users and not the manufacturers.

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    1. Good idea. I'll try to do one on appliances when I get a chance!

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  9. HI Ariel,
    Nice tidy and tiny. Except for the minus temps I could see my self living there.
    Great videos and engagingly narrated. I saw your Winter video and I felt frozen just watching it. Particularly the part about shoveling all that snow just to get to your systems! BRRRR.
    But as I was watching your walk around your Tiny I thought of these fabric tunnels my kids played with when small. What if you could place 2 or 3 of these (they are 28" diameter and 9 feet long)
    along the sides of the house to keep the snow out of your various plugs and vents for easy access to them? (of course you would need to work out a "connector" to the vents and tie them in to the tunnels). It should save you a lot of work shoveling snow. The tunnels are fabric and spring steel (see this site -https://www.amazon.com/Pacific-Play-Tents-Enormous-Connecting/dp/B000067817. and they are flexible but after it snows a few times, the snow will pack around the cylinder and keep a now-free path to your essential systems. Unfortunately I could not find a larger dia. for an adult and it will require some crawling but I think it beats shoveling.
    I tried to attach a pic but it does not seem to work.
    In any case I enjoyed the blogs and admire your conviction.
    Ciao

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    1. Thanks for your kind words. And for the suggestion. The snow weight would be an issue for sure. As well as the fact that that would trap all the things that need to vent. And I do enjoy shoveling. :)

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  10. Thank you for sharing this information. It has helped me to know more about
    best lifestyle blogs

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